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Recently Published

Summaries of the most recent articles published in STEM CELLS and STEM CELLS Translational Medicine.

September 17, 2019

Researchers led by Karin Tarte (Université de Rennes, France) recently assessed the influence of tissue of origin on the functional properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in a recent STEM CELLS study. Ménard et al.

September 17, 2019

Researchers led by Vincent M.

September 17, 2019

In a new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine study that aimed to develop a biomaterial platform for glial cell culture, researchers from the laboratory of

September 17, 2019

A current lack of markers for multipotent pericytes limits our understanding of their pathophysiological roles; however, researchers from the lab of Jun-ichi Kawabe (Asahikawa Medical University, Hokkaido, Japan) have now described how the implementation of EphA7 (Eph Receptor A7)  as a  marker to isolate pericytes from the microvessels of mouse subcutaneous adipose tissues. Yoshida et al.

September 10, 2019

While bone marrow‐derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) represent a highly utile cell type for cell transplantation therapy, the molecular network underlying BM-MSC proliferation remains poorly understood. Now, researchers led by Takeshi Teramura (Kindai University, Osaka, Japan) report TGFβ‐activated kinase (Tak1) as a critical regulator of BM-MSC proliferation.

September 10, 2019

Standard of care therapy for aggressive glioblastoma consists of safe maximum resection, concurrent temozolomide and X‐irradiation followed by adjuvant temozolomide therapy; however, we do not understand if this treatment approach affects adult neurogenesis in the ventricular‐subventricular zone (V‐SVZ) of the mammalian brain.

September 10, 2019

Exposure to lethal doses of ionizing radiation manifests as acute radiation syndrome (ARS), with the extent of radiation damage to the hematopoietic and gastrointestinal (GI) systems codetermining the acute survival of the exposed individual.

September 10, 2019

To study the role of Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), a negative regulator of Wnt/β‐catenin signaling, in human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), researchers from the lab of Dalit Ben‐Yosef

Past Buzz

September 17,2019 Limbal Stem Cell Versus Tissue Transplantation

Researchers led by Vincent M. Borderie (Sorbonne Université, France) recently reported on a comparison of autologous or allogeneic cultured limbal stem cell transplantation and autologous or allogeneic limbal tissue transplantation for the treatment of stage III limbal stem cell deficiency. In their new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine article, the authors noted that autologous cultured limbal stem cell transplantation associated with high long‐term survival, vision improvement, and overall safety, whereas limbal grafts featured low safety, and allogeneic grafts featured low success rate and serious adverse events.

September 17,2019 Epidermal Growth Factor-Hydrogel Promotes Astrocyte Culture

In a new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine study that aimed to develop a biomaterial platform for glial cell culture, researchers from the laboratory of Eng H. Lo (Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA) now describe the relative importance of epidermal growth factor containing hydrogels for primary astrocyte culture and their polarization into pro‐recovery phenotypes. Chan et al. hope that their findings will complement similar studies that have evaluated neural progenitor cells and neurogenesis and contribute towards cell and regenerative therapies in the central nervous system.

September 17,2019 Capillary-Resident EphA7-Positive Multipotent Pericytes

A current lack of markers for multipotent pericytes limits our understanding of their pathophysiological roles; however, researchers from the lab of Jun-ichi Kawabe (Asahikawa Medical University, Hokkaido, Japan) have now described how the implementation of EphA7 (Eph Receptor A7)  as a  marker to isolate pericytes from the microvessels of mouse subcutaneous adipose tissues. Yoshida et al. report in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine that these cells can form capillaries and display the ability to differentiate into mesenchymal and neuronal lineages, thereby suggesting their potential use in disease modeling and regenerative therapies.

September 10,2019 TAK1 is a Critical Regulator of BM-MSC Proliferation

While bone marrow‐derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) represent a highly utile cell type for cell transplantation therapy, the molecular network underlying BM-MSC proliferation remains poorly understood. Now, researchers led by Takeshi Teramura (Kindai University, Osaka, Japan) report TGFβ‐activated kinase (Tak1) as a critical regulator of BM-MSC proliferation. In their new STEM CELLS article, Onodera et al. report the activation of Tak1 by various mitogenic cytokines and the subsequently induced stabilization and nuclear localization of Yap1/Taz. Interestingly, reversible quiescence induced by Tak1 inhibition provided stress tolerance and improved engraftment for BM-MSCs in cell transplantation models.

September 10,2019 Resistance of Neural Stem Cells to Chemo‐Radiation Therapy

Standard of care therapy for aggressive glioblastoma consists of safe maximum resection, concurrent temozolomide and X‐irradiation followed by adjuvant temozolomide therapy; however, we do not understand if this treatment approach affects adult neurogenesis in the ventricular‐subventricular zone (V‐SVZ) of the mammalian brain. Reporting in a new STEM CELLS study, researchers from the lab of Michael L. Freeman (Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA) show that neural stem cells overexpress the anti‐apoptotic proteins Bcl2 and Mcl1 and do not undergo apoptosis in response to concurrent chemo‐radiation therapy. Overall, Cameron et al. therefore suggest that stem cell resistance will sustain neurogenesis and that targeting the V‐SVZ for the treatment of glioblastoma will not result in unacceptable toxicity.

September 10,2019 Mitigating ARS in the Mouse Gut

Exposure to lethal doses of ionizing radiation manifests as acute radiation syndrome (ARS), with the extent of radiation damage to the hematopoietic and gastrointestinal (GI) systems codetermining the acute survival of the exposed individual. In a recent STEM CELLS Translational Medicine article, researchers led by Frank Pajonk (UCLA, Los Angeles, California, USA) report that a piperazine compound prevents ARS in the mouse gut when given 24 hours after a lethal dose of radiation. Moreover, Duhachek‐Muggy et al. also uncover the underlying mechanism of action, thus providing a basis for the future rational development of effective radiation mitigators.

September 10,2019 Functional APC Required for ESC Self-renewal

To study the role of Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), a negative regulator of Wnt/β‐catenin signaling, in human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), researchers from the lab of Dalit Ben‐Yosef (Tel‐Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Israel) directly targeted APC in hESCs carrying a germline APC mutation. Reporting in STEM CELLS, Preisler et al. now show active repression by the tumor suppressor APC keeps Wnt/ß‐catenin signaling activity low in undifferentiated hESCs. Interestingly, the team also discovered that APC has a pivotal role in hESC self‐renewal by inhibiting Wnt/ß‐catenin induced differentiation and that cells rapidly differentiate into mesendoderm upon APC loss.

September 3,2019 Understanding Metabolism to Improve MSC Survival

To develop the next generation of cell‐delivery materials and methods, we must have a better understanding of the metabolic switches mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) experience upon transplantation. By designing treatment strategies with cell metabolism in mind, we may improve survival and the overall therapeutic potential of MSCs. Now, researchers from the laboratory of Hervé Petite provide a comprehensive review of plausible metabolic switches in response to implantation and the various strategies currently used to leverage MSC metabolism to improve stem cell‐based therapeutics. See STEM CELLS for more.

September 3,2019 Myometrial Cells Activate WNT Signaling in eMSCs

Researchers from the laboratories of William S.B. Yeung and Philip C.N. Chiu (University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong) recently hypothesized that human myometrial cells provide niche signals regulating the activities endometrial mesenchymal stem‐like cells (eMSCs). In their new STEM CELLS article, Cao et al. report that myometrial cells produce WNT5A to modulate the self‐renewal activities of endometrial stem cells through activation of WNT/β‐catenin signaling. The authors hope that their new findings will lead to the advanced treatment of women with atrophic endometrium or Asherman syndrome by stimulating self‐regrowth of their endometrium.

September 3,2019 MSC-Derived Extracellular Vesicle Therapy

A new review article from the laboratory of David S. Allan (University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada) highlights the progress made in mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)‐derived small extracellular vesicle (EV)‐based therapeutics. The team accomplish this feat by summarizing information regarding the starting material for MSC expansion, EV production, and isolation methods, studies from preclinical models that have established a foundation of knowledge to support translation into the patient setting, and potential barriers to overcome on the path to clinical application. For all the details, see STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now!