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Recently Published

Summaries of the most recent articles published in STEM CELLS and STEM CELLS Translational Medicine.

July 19, 2019

A recent concise review article in STEM CELLS from the laboratory of Inho Jo (Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Republic of Korea) summarizes the differentiation capacities of tonsil‐derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and their therapeutic competencies. Oh et al.

July 19, 2019

Researchers led by James L. Funderburgh (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA) recently sought to understand the mechanisms by which corneal stromal stem cells enhance corneal wounding by assessing extracellular vesicles.

July 19, 2019

Recent studies demonstrating that molecules secreted from astrocytes play crucial roles in neural stem cells (NSCs) fate determination, researchers sought to understand this process towards creating new strategies to treat traumatic brain injury (TBI).

July 19, 2019

Recent research highlighting the critical role of the tumor microenvironment in triple‐negative breast cancer (TNBC) development prompted researchers from the lab of Antoine E. Karnoub (Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA) to investigate the interaction of mesenchymal stem cells with TNBC cells.

July 16, 2019

A fascinating Perspective article recently published in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine 

July 16, 2019

The interaction of cancer cells with the multitude of other cell types present within the tumor microenvironment plays a crucial role in cancer development and progression.

July 16, 2019

A Concise Review from Irina Kareva (EMD Serono, Merck KGaA, Billerica, MA, USA) summarizes how immunometabolism may allow cancer cells to escape

July 16, 2019

A recently published Concise Review from Martin J.

Past Buzz

July 19,2019 Stem Cell Extracellular Vesicles Mediate Corneal Regeneration

Researchers led by James L. Funderburgh (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA) recently sought to understand the mechanisms by which corneal stromal stem cells enhance corneal wounding by assessing extracellular vesicles. In their new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine article, Shojaati et al. report that the delivery of miRNA to ocular tissues by extracellular vesicles leads to corneal regeneration. The authors hope that their findings will lead to the development of a rapid and inexpensive means of treating corneal blindness for millions of individuals who have no further options for treatment.

July 19,2019 Neonatal Astrocytes Promote NSC Proliferation Via TNC

Recent studies demonstrating that molecules secreted from astrocytes play crucial roles in neural stem cells (NSCs) fate determination, researchers sought to understand this process towards creating new strategies to treat traumatic brain injury (TBI). In their new STEM CELLS article, researchers led by Wei Shi, Xinghua Zhang, and Jian Chen (Nantong University, Nantong, PR China) demonstrate how neonatal rat astrocytes significantly promote the proliferation of NSCs, compared to adult rat astrocytes, thanks to the neonatal expression of Tenascin‐C (TNC). Indeed, Dai et al. discovered that TNC promoted NSC proliferation in vitro and in vivo.

July 19,2019 LINC01133 Promotes CSC-like Traits in TNBC

Recent research highlighting the critical role of the tumor microenvironment in triple‐negative breast cancer (TNBC) development prompted researchers from the lab of Antoine E. Karnoub (Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA) to investigate the interaction of mesenchymal stem cells with TNBC cells. Their findings, published recently in STEM CELLS, reports a role for MSCs in triggering the expression of the long non‐coding RNA LINC01133 in TNBC cells, which stimulates the propagation of cancer‐stem cell‐like phenotypic traits via upregulation of the pluripotency determining factor KLF4.

July 16,2019 Science and Social Media

A fascinating Perspective article recently published in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine from Alan Regenberg (Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, Baltimore, Maryland, USA) uses the case of the birth of the first human babies with germline gene editing to reflect on the evolving and increasing presence of social media in science, its strengths, weaknesses, and the potential to develop applications that improve how we review, approve, and engage around the work of science. The author suggests that facing the challenges of social media use in science may allow for greater transparency, access, and engagement—and could nurture the public's trust.

July 16,2019 Reviewing Adipose Stem Cells and Cancer

The interaction of cancer cells with the multitude of other cell types present within the tumor microenvironment plays a crucial role in cancer development and progression. Now, researchers from the laboratory of Bruce A. Bunnell (Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA) discuss the interactions between adipose stem cells, a critical component of the tumor microenvironment, and various forms of cancer in a recently published STEM CELLS review article.

 

July 16,2019 Metabolism in Cancer Immunoediting

A Concise Review from Irina Kareva (EMD Serono, Merck KGaA, Billerica, MA, USA) summarizes how immunometabolism may allow cancer cells to escape from the immune system, a process also known as immunoediting, while also highlighting the emerging role of gut microbiota and their effect on the immune system and response to immunotherapy. Furthermore, this recently published STEM CELLS article also discusses how these pieces can be integrated to devise better combination therapies and highlight the role of computational approaches as a potential tool to aid in combination therapy design.

July 16,2019 Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Anno 2019

A recently published Concise Review from Martin J. Hoogduijn (Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands) and Eleuterio Lombardo (Cell Therapy Technology Center, Madrid, Spain) provides an overview of the considered mechanism of action of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and the status of the development of MSC therapy as of 2019. Writing in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine, the authors note that the increased interest in the therapeutic use of MSCs and the ongoing elucidation of the mechanisms of action of MSCs represent promising indicators that 2019 may be the dawn of the therapeutic era of MSCs and that there will be revived interest in research to develop more efficient, practical, and sustainable MSC‐based therapies.

July 9,2019 Optimizing Atorvastatin-pretreated MSCs for AMI Treatment

Previous studies from the labs of Li Qian (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA) and Yue‐Jin Yang (Fuwai Hospital, Beijing, China) demonstrated how the combination of atorvastatin (ATV) and ATV‐pretreated mesenchymal stem cells (ATV‐MSCs) at one week post‐acute myocardial infarction (AMI) promoted MSC recruitment and survival. Now, the team returns with a new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine article in which they now establish that multiple intravenous administrations of ATV‐MSCs combined with intensive ATV administration at the mid‐term stage of AMI leads to optimal results. Overall, Xu et al. believe that the translational potential of this study to be “promising, straightforward, and enormous”.

July 9,2019 NSC Treatment Feasible for Motor Stroke

A recent STEM CELLS Translational Medicine article reports the findings of a single‐site, phase I study of the transplantation of human neural stem cells (NSCs) for the treatment of hemiparesis due to chronic motor stroke. Researchers from the labs of Karl K. Johe (Neuralstem Inc., Germantown, Maryland, USA) and Xu Ruxiang (Army General Hospital of PLA, Beijing, China) provide evidence of stable allogeneic neural tissue formation by the stem cells in the brains of chronic stroke patients, suggesting statistically significant clinical benefits from baseline as measured by three different validated stroke scales.

July 9,2019 Drug Screening for Dysferlinopathy Using iPSCs

Given the lack of effective pharmaceutical approaches to the treatment of the progressive muscle disorder dysferlinopathy, researchers led by Yuko Kokubu and Hidetoshi Sakurai (Kyoto University, Japan) sought to use screen myocytes from induced pluripotent stem cells derived from a dysferlinopathy patient (Miyoshi myopathy). Reporting in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine, the authors now report nocodazole as a drug candidate that affects microtubule organization and autophagy function. The team hopes that their new findings will contribute to the enhance clinical treatment of dysferlinopathy.