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Press Releases from AlphaMed Press

October 31, 2018

Durham, NC (October 31, 2018)– A study released today in STEM CELLS moves scientists a step closer to finding how to help the body regenerate joint cartilage ravaged by disease. Their work reveals a new method to quickly and efficiently produce virtually unlimited numbers of chondrocytes, the cells that form cartilage, from human skin cells converted to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). For the 54 million Americans suffering from arthritis – the nation’s Number One disability – this could be great news.

October 8, 2018

A new study published in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine shows that the energy metabolism of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can be targeted to increase their ability to enhance tissue regeneration. The study offers a strategy that has immediate translational potential for improving hMSCs’ therapeutic success.

hMSCs have gained significant interest as an “off-the-shelf” product for cell therapy in various types of diseases. Recent findings suggest that instead of replacing damaged cells through differentiation, as initially thought, hMSCs promote tissue regeneration by coordinating multiple components of the host immune system via the release of immunomodulatory factors. Therefore, understanding the mechanism underpinning hMSC immune polarization and secretory function is critical to enhancing their therapeutic outcome.

September 24, 2018

DURHAM, NC — A study recently published in STEM CELLS suggests unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSCs) derived from human cord blood can ease fibrosis and inflammation in a painful type of skin disorder called recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB). The stems cells also can potentially prevent malignant tumors, a frequent side effect of RDEB, from forming.

September 10, 2018

Durham, NC, September (2018) – A new study published in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine details a novel stem cell treatment with the potential to restore sight after a serious chemical burn to the eye.

September 5, 2018

A team of researchers developed a biocompatible scaffold seeded with molecule-releasing stem cells that, when implanted in mice with a rare but deadly bone disease called autosomal recessive osteopetrosis (ARO), showed potential to help these animals. The findings, recently published in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine (SCTM), might someday yield a treatment for humans afflicted by the same devastating condition.

August 29, 2018

A new study recently published in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine demonstrates the long-term safety of laboratory-expanded endothelial progenitor cells for treating ischemic stroke. This could be good news for the 15 million people who, according to to the World Stroke Organization, suffer from this dangerous condition each year.

August 8, 2018

A new study published in STEM CELLS, conducted by researchers at the University of Amsterdam, shows how mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have multiple immune modulatory properties that could benefit the treatment of sepsis. This study also examines the importance of how MSCs affect inflammatory responses in humans.

Sepsis is a complication caused by the body's overwhelming response to infection and can lead to organ failure. It is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite the use of antibiotics and well-quipped intensive care facilities, sepsis kills about one in every four patients who contract it.

August 6, 2018

In a new study published by STEM CELLS, researchers at Newcastle University, UK, describe a new organoid model that encompasses all human retinal cell types and that is responsive to light. Their work could have great impact on finding new treatments for the visually impaired by making drug and toxicology screening faster and more efficient.

Majlinda Lako, PhD Photo
July 30, 2018

 

DURHAM, N.C. JULY 2018

A new type of stem cell treatment is showing promise for patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD) who suffer from critical limb ischemia (CLI). Results of a clinical trial, reported on in a recently published article in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine, show that five out of the six patients in the trial were CLI-free one year after treatment.

Dr. Takayasu Ohtake and Dr. Shuzo Kobayashi
July 23, 2018

Durham, NC. - July 2018

Researchers have developed what appears to be a simple, minimally invasive, effective way to treat osteoarthritis (OA) in dogs that may prove to be of considerable importance in treating humans, too. The study detailing this new approach appears in the latest issue of STEM CELLS Translational Medicine (SCTM).

Dr. Offer Zeira

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