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Embargo Policy: Articles for STEM CELLS and STEM CELLS Translational Medicine are embargoed for release until 9 a.m. Eastern U.S. time on the day the article is posted online. This policy applies to members of the media, authors, institutions' public information officers, and the public. Authors may not discuss their work with the media until 1 week before the mailing date or 1 week before online posting of the article, whichever is earlier, and must ensure that the media representatives agree to abide by the embargo policy. STEM CELLS Translational Medicine may refuse to publish a manuscript, despite acceptance for publication, if it has been prematurely released to the press.

April 11, 2019

DURHAM, N.C. (APRIL 11, 2019) - A study released today in STEM CELLS shows how a new class of cancer drugs, called Smac mimetics, is effective in killing off the stem cells that lead to glioblastoma (GBM) depending on oxygen level. This might help pave the way to a new, more efficient method for treating the most common and aggressive form of brain cancer in adults.

April 9, 2019

DURHAM, N.C. (APRIL 09, 2019) - Stem cells collected from the patient’s own bone marrow holds great interest as a potential therapy for osteoarthritis of the knee (KOA) because of their ability to regenerate the damaged cartilage. The results were released today in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine (SCTM).

March 26, 2019

DURHAM, N.C. MARCH 26, 2019 - The potential for stem cells to reduce damage, regenerate tissue and promote functional recovery after a spinal cord injury (SCI) is being tested in several ongoing clinical trials. However, a new study released today in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine (SCTM) indicates that donor age-dependent stem cell therapy could help optimize cell treatment strategies for clinical translation.

February 26, 2019

Durham, NC – A groundbreaking study released today in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine shows that the  gold standard for obtaining stem cells to use in transplantation therapy – harvesting them from the patient himself – is not the best way to go when attempting to regenerate bone in a person with type 1 diabetes.

Type 1 diabetes is linked to low bone density, which greatly increases the risk of fractures. Researchers don’t know exactly why — it might be that insulin, which is deficient in the disease, promotes bone growth and strength – but all agree that finding a way to address this issue is important.

February 4, 2019

DURHAM, N.C. FEBRUARY 04, 2019 - Benjamin “Beno” Freedman, Ph.D., is named STEM CELLS' Young Investigator of 2018 for his groundbreaking work with organoids in studying kidney structure and disease. This award fosters advancements in the fields of stem cells and regenerative medicine by honoring a young researcher who is principal author of an article published in STEM CELLS that is deemed to have the most impact and to push the boundaries of novel and insightful research.

January 28, 2019

Durham, NC - (January 28, 2019)– A study released today in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine provides a deeper and clearer understanding of how patients suffering vision loss in both eyes due to limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) might benefit from a stem cell transplant using donated cells. This is the first randomized, controlled study to investigate the safety and efficacy of this method, in which corneal epithelial stem cells procured from a deceased donor and expanded in the lab were transplanted in the patient’s eye.

January 23, 2019

DURHAM, N.C. JANUARY 23, 2019 - Yong-Beom Park, M.D., Ph.D., is named the STEM CELLS Translational Medicine’s Young Investigator of 2018 for his research in cartilage regeneration in osteoarthritic patients. The award fosters advancements in the field of stem cells and regenerative medicine by honoring a young researcher who is principle author of an article published in SCTM that is deemed to have the most impact and to push the boundaries of novel and insightful research.

January 17, 2019

DURHAM, N.C. (JANUARY 17, 2019) - A new study released this week in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine (SCTM) offers hope for anyone who has suffered a serious corneal injury that did not respond well to conventional treatment. It details how an application of freeze-dried mesenchymal stem cell secretome (secreted factors), reconstituted in a gel made up of hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate (HA/CS), not only enhances wound healing, but reduces scarring and other frequent complications, too.

December 17, 2018

 

DURHAM, N.C. (December 2018) Skeletal (mesenchymal) stem cells (MSCs) are being used in an increasing number of clinical trials for their therapeutic benefits in tissue regeneration and fracture healing. However, their poor homing capacity to the injured site presents a major challenge to realizing their full capabilities. A new study recently published in STEM CELLS shows a possible way to overcome that.

November 19, 2018

Durham, NC (November 19, 2018) – A new study in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine indicates mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a safe and innovative option to heal normal tissue following radiotherapy. Alain Chapel, Ph.D., and Annette Larsen, DVM, Ph.D., of the Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) in France led the team that conducted this research.

More than 14 million new cases of cancer are diagnosed globally each year, according to the National Institutes of Health. Of those, half could benefit from radiation therapy. However, radiotherapy can cause substantial damage to a patient’s normal tissue. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used to help alleviate this damage, but their potential to lead to residual tumor cells is worrisome.

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