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Highlights of current exciting developments, ranging from research papers to court decisions to industry regulations

September 21, 2017

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Past Buzz

September 17,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - MSCs for Clinical Trials, MSC-Exosomes in Cancer Progression, Evolution of Glioblastoma Stem-Like Cells, and WJ-MSC Differentiation to Osteoblasts!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Interferon-γ Primed MSCs for Clinical Trials

A large number of studies have demonstrated the safety of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based treatments, and now, the focus has moved onto engineering MSCs to enhance their therapeutic value. Now, a new study from the lab of Edwin M. Horwitz (Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA) now reports on the generation of Interferon-γ (IFNγ) primed MSCs for future application in clinical trials. Guess et al. hope that this strategy will reduce the need to infuse thawed cryopreserved cells, which may present with a reduced cell potency. See STEM CELLS Translational Medicine for all the details.

p53 deficient-MSC-Exosomes Promote Cancer Progression

A new study from the labs of Hui Qian and Wenrong Xu (Jiangsu University, PR China) has assessed the impact of p53 status in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on exosome secretion and cancer progression. Mao et al. now report that p53-null bone marrow-derived MSC exosomes deliver elevated levels of UBR2 (ubiquitin protein ligase E3 component n-recognin 2) to target cells to promote gastric cancer development and metastasis via the modulation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. See STEM CELLS now for all the fine print.

Genetic Evolution of Glioblastoma Stem-Like Cells

New research from Carla Boccaccio (University of Torino Medical School, Italy) and Gaetano Finocchiaro (Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico, Milan, Italy) reports the existence of phylogenetically-related glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSCs) in matched primary and recurrent Glioblastoma multiform (GBM) tumors. Orzan et al. also suggest that recurrent GSCs likely pre-exist in the untreated primary tumor and are both mutagenized and positively selected by chemo-radiotherapy. Head over to STEM CELLS now for a deeper delve into this important study.

Epigenetic Regulation of RUNX2 Induction during WJ-MSC Differentiation to Osteoblasts

A recent STEM CELLS study from the lab of Verónica Palma (Universidad de Chile, Chile) sought to discover the mechanisms behind the differentiation of Umbilical cord Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells (WJ-MSC) to immature osteoblasts. Bustos et al. now report that the inhibition of JARID1B histone demethylase activity promotes the expression of the osteoblast master-regulator RUNX2 to promote osteoblastic potential. For all the details on this great new study, make your way over to STEM CELLS now!

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

September 14,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Kidney Generation with hPSCs, hPSC Hematopoietic Differentiation, LeX-SSEA1 in NSCs, and Allogeneic ASCs for Heart Disease!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Reviewing Kidney Generation with hPSCs

Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) represent attractive sources for kidney regenerative therapies and a recent review from the labs of Ryuji Morizane and Joseph V. Bonventre (Harvard Institute of Medicine, Boston, USA) aimed to summarize recent studies. These include efforts to induce nephron progenitor cells (NPCs) and kidney cells from hPSCs, and to expand NPCs from both mouse and human embryonic kidneys. Furthermore, the authors discuss possible in vivo cell therapy approaches to regenerate kidneys and the development of bioengineered kidneys. See STEM CELLS now for a fascinating read.

RUNX1c-mediated Control of hPSC Hematopoietic Differentiation

Researchers from the labs of Pablo Menendez (Barcelona University, Spain) and Pedro J. Real (Universidad de Granada, Spain) have recently employed human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) as a model to study roles for the master hematopoietic transcription factor RUNX1 in human embryonic hematopoiesis. In their new STEM CELLS study, Navarro-Montero et al. describe how RUNX1c orchestrates hematopoietic specification of hPSCs, possibly in cooperation with pro-inflammatory signaling. Sounds like exciting reading!

Exploring LeX-SSEA1 in NSCs

The carbohydrate LeX-SSEA1 acts as a cell surface marker for neural stem cells (NSCs); but what is the biological significance of LeX-SSEA1? Research from the team of Francesca Ciccolini (University of Heidelberg, Germany) now demonstrate that surface expression of LeXSSEA1 inversely correlates with proliferative ability, high LeX-SSEA1 levels correlate with quiescence, and that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) promotes LeX-SSEA1 expression. Overall, this new STEM CELLS study suggests that increased expression of LeX-SSEA1 at the cell surface promotes quiescence in NSCs.

Safety Study of Allogeneic ASCs for Ischemic Heart Disease and Heart Failure

A new report from STEM CELLS Translational Medicine describes the results from a recent first-in-human clinical trial evaluating the safety and feasibility of intramyocardial injection of cryopreserved allogeneic adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) for the treatment of ischemic heart disease and ischemic heart failure (IHF). The report, from Jens Kastrup (Rigshospitalet University of Copenhagen, Denmark), concludes that the procedure was both safe and feasible with a tendency towards efficacy. The team hopes to confirm these encouraging results in larger placebo controlled clinical trials.

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

September 11,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Reviewing Stem Cell Bioprinting, Cardiovascular Regeneration with MSCs, Hair Follicle Stem Cell Regulation, and Sepsis and Septic Shock Treatment!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Transplantable Tissue and Organs by Stem Cell Bioprinting

Bioprinting with stem cells holds the potential to generate transplantable tissues and organs. A new report from the lab of Ibrahim T. Ozbolat (Penn State University, Pennsylvania, USA) reviews this evolving field, with a particular focus on bioink materials consisting of biomaterials and living cells. Head over to STEM CELLS Translational Medicine for what promises to be a great read!

Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Cardiovascular Regeneration

The next review, from the labs of Marcin Majka (Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland), concentrates on the potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the regeneration of the cardiovascular system. The review summarizes preclinical and clinical trials with strong emphasis on mechanisms of MSCs action and provides a comprehensive summary of ongoing and completed studies. Another STEM CELLS Translational Medicine review and another fantastic read!

Regulating Hair Follicle Stem Cells: A Review

Another review (!), this time from Rui Yi (University of Colorado Boulder, USA), aims to divulge all on recent progress in the study of the hair follicle stem cell (HSFC) regulation. HFSCs represent an emerging model system to study mechanisms that regulate dividing and quiescent adult stem cells and this new STEM CELLS study outlines recent progress with a focus on transcription and signaling mechanisms and their implications.

Treating Sepsis and Septic Shock with MSCs?

To conclude this week’s selection of reviews is a report from the lab of Danièle Bensoussan (CHRU de Nancy, France) on the application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to treat sepsis and septic shock. These disorders represent a significant public health issue due to the number of deaths worldwide and the lack of effective treatment. This new review hopes to summarize recent studies in this field and highlight possible MSC mechanisms of action. See STEM CELLS now for all the details!

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

September 8,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? – NSC Regulation, MSC Chondrogenesis, Revealing HSC Heterogeneity, and Fetal Membranes in Regenerative Medicine!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Regulating NSCs via Cdk4 and Insulin-IRS2

Researchers from the labs of Isabel Fariñas (Universidad de Valencia, Spain) and Deborah Burks (CIPF, Valencia, Spain) sought to explore the effects of insulin on adult neural stem cells (NSCs). Chirivella et al. now report that insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2) mediates an increase in G1-phase cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4) activity and cell cycle progression in response to insulin, and this promotes terminal differentiation of NSCs. Could this data be employed to construct a rational strategy for efficient neuron generation for the treatment of a wide range of disorders? See STEM CELLS now for the answer!

ROR2 Marks MSCs with Enhanced Chondrogenic Potential

Multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represent a mixed population of cells with differing potential; so, how can we tell them apart? New research from the lab of Anthony P Hollander (University of Liverpool, UK) reveals that MSCs expressing high levels of ROR2 (receptor tyrosine kinase like orphan receptor 2) represent a defined population of cells with enhanced cartilage-producing capabilities. Dickinson et al. hope that these findings may aid in the quest to construct a more effective cell therapy for cartilage injuries. See STEM CELLS for all the details.

Revealing HSC Heterogeneity after Infection

A new study from the labs of Adam L MacLean and Michael PH Stumpf (Imperial College London, London, UK) sought to analyze the heterogeneity of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) system in response to infection (by Trichinella spiralis) to uncover alterations to 3D niche dynamics and migration patterns. Their STEM CELLS study indicates that infection promotes two differing dynamic HSC strategies (a pattern of revisiting previously explored space and a pattern of exploring new space) that may enable mice to cope better in deteriorating HSC-niche microenvironments following infection.

Reviewing the Application of Fetal Membranes in Regenerative Medicine

A recent review article from Rebecca Lim (Hudson Institute of Medical Research, Victoria, Australia) hopes to tell us the history and the possible future regenerative worth of the fetal membrane of the amniotic sac. While the fetal membrane has found clinical use for over a century, recent studies on the membrane and derived stem and stem-like cells have brought this potentially exciting material back into the spotlight. Head on over to STEM CELLS Translational Medicine to read more about this old, but new potentially exciting resource!

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

September 3,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? – Hepatic Differentiation, Repairing CNS Damage, Enhancing HSC Engraftment, and SSCs for Osteoporosis Treatment!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Commitment to Hepatic Differentiation via the TCF7L2-PGC1g Axis

Numerous studies have evidenced a link between mitochondrial activity and stem cell fate. In a new STEM CELLS study, the lab of Patricia Renard (University of Namur, Belgium) identifies a novel transcriptional regulatory axis coupling the loss of pluripotency and hepatic differentiation to the initiation of mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative metabolic shift. This new axis involves Transcription Factor 7 Like 2 (TCF7L2 - a downstream effector of the Wnt/b‐catenin pathway, repressed during differentiation) and PPARg coactivator 1a (PGC1α - the master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis, induced during differentiation).

 

SVF Cells Repair CNS Damage via Alternatively Activated Macrophages

Recent studies from the lab of Bruce A. Bunnell (Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, USA) discovered that adipose stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells led to functional, immunological, and pathological improvements in a mouse multiple sclerosis model. Now, Bowles et al demonstrate that SVF cells induce regulatory T cells and alternatively activated macrophages and this helped to reduce cellular infiltrates and attenuate neuroinflammation in central nervous system (CNS) tissues to promote repair. See STEM CELLS for all the details.

Specific in vitro Expansion Conditions Enhance HSC Engraftment in vivo

The necessary ex vivo culture and amplification of adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) can lead to the loss of engraftment and function. Now, the lab of Thalia Papayannopoulou (University of Washington, USA) report that exposure of HSCs in culture to a small molecule combination that maintains low expression of the Rap1/Ras/PI3K-AKT pathway allowed higher engraftment levels following transplantation in NSG mice. See STEM CELLS Translational Medicine for all the fine print.

Reviewing Musculoskeletal Stem Cells for Osteoporosis Treatment

A new review from Jeffrey Kiernan, John E. Davies, and William L. Stanford considers the potential for bone regeneration via the application of skeletal stem cells (SSCs). SSCs represent a rare population of cells residing with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and may be employed to treat conditions such as age-related (type-II) osteoporosis. For a great read, head over to STEM CELLS Translational Medicine.

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

August 30,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? – Modeling Glaucoma, Accelerating Fracture Healing, Treating Lung Disease, and a Lung Disease Workshop Report!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Modeling Glaucoma with Mutant iPSCs

To assess the contribution of progressive retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration to glaucoma, researchers from the lab of Iqbal Ahmad (University of Nebraska Medical Center, USA) have modeled the disease via the generation and RGC-specific differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) carrying a glaucoma risk allele. Teotia et al. now demonstrate that SIX6 mutations influence RGC differentiation and their survival and so may make RGCs vulnerable in glaucoma in the adult. Head over to STEM CELLS now for all the details.

Accelerating Fracture Healing with Engineered MSCs

To accelerate bone fracture healing via the reparative/regenerative actions of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), researchers from the lab of Wei Yao (UC Davis, California, USA) have engineered cells to overexpress basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Excitingly, their strategy accelerated fracture healing by increasing the production of growth factors that both stimulated angiogenesis and enhanced the differentiation of MSCs to osteoblasts that formed new bone. See all the exciting details at STEM CELLS Translational Medicine.

Treating Lung Disease with Allogeneic Lung Spheroid Cells

Cell therapy employing adipose or bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represents a promising treatment strategy for pulmonary fibrosis. However, new research from the labs of Ke Cheng and Leonard Jason Lobo (University of North Carolina, USA) took another path and assessed the utility of adult lung spheroid cells (LSCs) as an intrinsic source of therapeutic lung stem cells. Encouragingly, Cores et al. report that the infusion of allogeneic LSCs reduced progression of inflammation and fibrotic manifestation and preserved epithelial and endothelial health without eliciting a significant immune rejection. Read all the fine print over at STEM CELLS Translational Medicine.

Proceedings from the CIRM Regenerative Medicine for Lung Diseases Workshop

In a recent article, Lisa C. Kadyk, Natalie D. DeWitt, and Brigitte Gomperts have reported on the 2016 California Institute of Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) workshop on regenerative medicine approaches for the treatment of lung diseases. To read about all that went on at this highly engaging workshop, see STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now!

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

August 8,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Stem Cell Signaling in Xenopus, ASCs and Corneal Failure, GABPα and mESC Survival, and Inhibiting Tumorigenicity with Reprogramming!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Delineating Stem Cell Signaling During Xenopus Intestinal Remodeling

Researchers from the lab of Atsuko Ishizuya-Oka (Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan) recently sought to precisely understand control of adult epithelial development in the Xenopus laevis intestine by the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Their recent STEM CELLS paper focused on the major Wnt target and thyroid hormone responsive gene CD44, demonstrating that TH activates hyaluronan/CD44 signaling in the metamorphosing intestine to control intestinal remodeling during adult stem cell development. It turns out that the amphibian intestine may be a highly valuable animal model for studies of stem cell regulation!

Adipose tissue-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Treatment for Corneal Failure

The loss or dysfunction of limbal stem cells can lead to visual loss, chronic pain, and inflammation of the ocular surface. The question arises; can we apply other adult stem cells to compensate for this loss? Researchers from the laboratory of Teresa Nieto-Miguel and Sara Galindo (Universidad de Valladolid, Spain) have recently demonstrated that transplantation of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) into rabbit eyes lacking limbal stem cells was not only well tolerated, but also reduced inflammation and partially restored the corneal and limbal epithelial phenotypes. See STEM CELLS now for all the fine print.

GABPα and mESC Survival

The Ets-related transcription factor GA-binding protein alpha (GABPα) seemingly has its molecular toes in many a biological pie! To understand any potential role for GABPα in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), the labs of Tadayuki Akagi and Takashi Yokota (Kanazawa University, Japan) generated and characterized a Gabpa conditional knockout ESC line. Overall, experiments employing these cells by Ueda et al. suggested that Gabpa normally functions to inhibit p53 accumulation and thereby regulates the proliferation and survival of ESCs. See STEM CELLS Translational Medicine for all the details.

Reprogramming inhibits Tumorigenicity!

Research from the labs of Chang-Shen Lin and Kazunari K. Yokoyama (Kaohsiung Medical University, Taiwan) sought to assess reprogramming of cancer cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as a means of inhibiting oncogenesis. Their new STEM CELLS article now demonstrates that JDP2 and OCT4 can reprogram human gastric cells, and this process is associated with the epigenetic silencing of oncogenic BMP7 by the recruitment of HOXA13–HOTTIP and HOXA13–HOTAIR complexes. Sounds like an interesting study!

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

August 1,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Stem Cells for Corneal Wound Healing, Reprogramming Leukemic Cells, Marketing of High-Cost Regenerative Medicine, and Predicting Effects of MSCs on SLE!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Reviewing Stem Cells for Corneal Wound Healing

Wound healing in the cornea in response to injury or surgery represents a complex process governed by various types of stem cells. A recent review article in STEM CELLS from the lab of Alexander V. Ljubimov (Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, USA) now presents, for the first time, the available evidence on stem cell participation in corneal wound healing. Furthermore, Saghizadeh et al. report on significant studies regarding the generation of corneal stem cells from pluripotent stem cells (among notable other cell sources) and their applicability to wound healing.

Tales from Reprograming Leukemic Cells to Pluripotency

A brief report from the laboratory of Mickie Bhatia (McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada) tells of his team’s recent efforts in the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from leukemic cells as a modeling tool. In a STEM CELLS brief report,Lee et al. reveal that reprogramming in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells is a rare event that only occurs in those cells without genomic aberrations. Therefore, leukemic cells may suffer from an inherent “blockage” that prevents the attainment of the pluripotent state.

How to Plan Ahead in the Marketing of High Cost Regenerative Medicine

A review from the lab of Richard T. Maziarz (Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA), published in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine brings us something different this week. In their words, “The development of cellular therapies faces a series of regulatory obstacles. Often overlooked will be barriers to utilization based upon reimbursement issues, practice guidelines, and payer contract restrictions. The authors provide guidance for early planning of reimbursement strategies to be performed by the cellular therapy biotechnology industry to assure successful launches within the U.S. multi-payer as well as the European Union members single-payer systems.” Sounds like a fascinating read!

Predicting the Effect of MSC Treatment in SLE Patients

A new study from the lab of Lingyun Sun (Nanjing University Medical School, China) aimed to identify possible serum markers to predict the therapeutic effect of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In STEM CELLS Translational Medicine, Wang et al. report that high levels of IFN-γ indicated a good clinical response to MSCs transplantation when followed-up for one year.

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

July 28,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? – pNSC Brain Repair, Pluripotent stem cell‐derived Osteoblasts, Chemokine Treatment for ISD, and Adverse Events in Adipose-Derived Cell Therapy!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Primitive Neural Stem Cells Repair the Mouse Brain

Adult mouse primitive neural stem cells (pNSCs) derived from the forebrain subependymal zone bordering the lateral ventricles usually reside in a very slow-cycling state; however, researchers from the lab of Rachel L. Reeve (University of Toronto, Canada) hypothesized that GFAP-OCT4+ pNSCs could play a key role in brain repair. Their new STEM CELLS study now demonstrates that pNSCs proliferate and contribute to the replacement of definitive NSCs (developmentally downstream of pNSCs) following cytosine β-d-arabinofuranoside ablation. Could pNSCs represent an excellent source of cells for cell-based regenerative therapies in humans?

Pluripotent stem cell‐derived Osteoblasts Get the Job Done!

Osteoblasts are a crucial cell type, given that they support hematopoiesis in the bone marrow and maintain healthy bone. Now, researchers from the lab of Joy Y. Wu (Stanford University School of Medicine, USA) have assessed whether pluripotent stem cells can rescue aberrant skeletal development and bone marrow hematopoiesis in vivo. In their new STEM CELLS study, Chubb et al. describe two novel complementation assays, which demonstrate that induced pluripotent stem cell‐derived osteoblasts can compensate for the loss of osteoblast lineage cells in transgenic mice to form mineralized bone and bone marrow hematopoietic niche in vivo.

 

Chemokine vs. Stem Cells: Which is best for Urinary Sphincter Deficiency Treatment?

Intrinsic urinary sphincter deficiency (ISD) treatment normally comprises skeletal muscle precursor cell (skMPC) therapy; however, results have proved disappointing. A new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine article from the lab of J. Koudy Williams (Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA) now compares the safety and efficacy of the cell homing chemokine CXCL12 versus skMPCs in a rat model of ISD. William et al. demonstrate that CXCL12 treatment can restore sphincter muscle content with little clinical or tissue pathology in the short term. Therefore, treatment with a chemical that stimulates the body to heal itself may represent a novel ISD treatment strategy.

Reviewing Reported Adverse Events in Adipose-Derived Cell Therapy

A new review article from the lab of Navid Mohamadpour Toyserkani (Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark) aims to bring us all up to date with adverse reactions associated with adipose-derived cell therapy with a special focus on the risk of thromboembolic, immunological, and oncological safety concerns. Toyserkani et al. suggest that while adipose-derived cell therapy has a favorable safety profile, improvements to safety assessment are required to fully appreciate all adverse events moving forward. See STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now for a great read!

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

July 20,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? – Chemoresistance in CSCs, MSC-IL6 and CSC Formation, Exosomal ncRNA Showdown in PSC-CMs, and the Therapeutic How-to Guide for EVs!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

CSCs Acquire Chemoresistance through FBXW7 and c-Myc

Using a previously established colorectal cancer stem cell model, the team of Takatsugu Ishimoto (Kumamoto University, Japan) has recently identified a potential means to inhibit CSC-mediated resistance to anticancer agents. Their new STEM CELLS study indicates that overexpression of FBXW7 in CSCs mediates the loss of c-Myc expression and reduces sensitivity to anticancer agents. Therefore, Izumi et al. suggest that “inhibition of FBXW7-upregulation in CSCs after chemotherapy may enhance response to anticancer agents and may be an effective strategy to eliminate colorectal CSCs.”

MSC-IL6 Promotes CSC-like Transformation through EMT

A new study from the labs of Anh D. Le and Qunzhou Zhang (University of Pennsylvania, USA) has investigated cancer stem cell (CSC)-like transformation in benign epithelial tumors, specifically solid/multicystic follicular ameloblastoma (AM). Jiang et al. now demonstrate that Interleukin-6 (IL6) secreted from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) promotes a CSC-like transformation by inducing an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in epithelial cells via STAT3 and ERK1/2-mediated signaling pathways. See STEM CELLS now for all the details.

ESC-CMs vs. iPSC-CMs: The Exosome ncRNA Showdown for MI

The labs of Joseph C. Wu or Sang-Ging Ong (Stanford University School of Medicine, CA, United States) bring a scientific showdown to STEM CELLS in the form of a comparison human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (ESC-CMs) and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) for cardiac regenerative therapy. Lee et al. report that an identical repertoire of microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs play a role in improved cardiac function following iPSC- and ESC-CM transplantation. For all the details, see STEM CELLS now!

Extracellular Vesicles: The How-To Guide for Therapeutic Use

A report published recently in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine reads like a veritable “How-to Guide” for the therapeutic use of extracellular vesicles (EVs). This new article provides details on the recent workshop convened by the members of the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles and the Society for Clinical Research and Translation of Extracellular Vesicles (Singapore) to discuss opportunities/challenges associated with the development of EV-based therapeutics at both preclinical and clinical levels. Head on over to this article from Eva Rohde (Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg, Austria) and Sai Kiang Lim (A*STAR, Singapore) to see how the Workshop’s suggestions may enhance the development of best-practice models for EV therapies now!

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!