You are here

Stem Cells Buzz

Comment

Discuss

Highlights of current exciting developments, ranging from research papers to court decisions to industry regulations

January 18, 2018

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Past Buzz

January 15,2018 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Exosome Mediated Lung Repair, NSPC Metabolic Regulation, Tenogenic Control by AKT‐mTOR, and Oligodendrocyte Differentiation by AKAP12!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

hAEC Exosome Mediated Lung Repair

Researchers from the laboratory of Rebecca Lim (Hudson Institute of Medical Research, Victoria, Australia) recently sought to explore treatment with human amnion epithelial cell-derived exosomes (hAEC Exo) as a potential treatment for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).  Tan et al. describe how the proteins contained within exosomes polarized and increased macrophage phagocytosis, reduced neutrophil myeloperoxidases, and suppressed T cell proliferation directly, all leading to reduced lung inflammation following bleomycin challenge. For all the details, see in a recent STEM CELLS Translational Medicine.

Nestin‐Cdk5‐Drp1 Axis in Metabolic Regulation of NSPCs

In an attempt to fully understand the mechanisms of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) stemness regulation, to advance their therapeutic potential, researchers from the lab of Andy Peng Xiang (Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangdong, China) have discovered a new metabolic “axis”. Wang et al. now describe how the Nestin‐Cdk5‐Drp1 axis promotes mitochondrial fission and glycolysis, which is indispensable for NSPC maintenance. For more of the fine print, see STEM CELLS now!

AKT‐mTOR axis regulates MSC Tenogenesis

Stimulating heightened levels of tenogenesis in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may prove an invaluable strategy for the tendon reparative strategies. Now, the research teams of Yi Ting Zhou and Xiao Chen (Zhejiang University, China) reveal that the AKT‐mTOR axis represents an essential mediator of MSC collagen production and tenogenesis, offering a potential therapeutic target for tendon repair strategies. See STEM CELLS now for all the details.

 

AKAP12 in Adult White Matter

The processes that control the differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) to oligodendrocytes in cerebral white matter remain to be fully described. However, a new STEM CELLS study from the labs of Ken Arai and Eng H. Lo (Neuroprotection Research Laboratory, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, USA) now hopes to shed a little more light onto the process. Maki et al. demonstrate how oligodendrocyte renewal by OPCs in young‐adult mice requires the function of A‐kinase anchor protein 12 (AKAP12), a scaffolding protein that associates with intracellular molecules such as protein kinase A.

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

January 8,2018 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - NKX2-5 Mutations and CHD, Murine Corneal Renewal, Stem Cell Fate and Chromatin, and Fat-Cancer Cell Interactions!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

How NKX2-5 Mutations cause Congenital Heart Defects

While studies have forged a link between congenital heart defects (CHDs) and NKX2-5 gene mutations, we still do not understand how these mutations cause disease. Now, new research out of the labs of Patrick G. Burgon and Ilona Skerjanc (University of Ottawa, Canada) employing a knock‐in mouse embryonic stem cell model of cardiomyogenesis has provided a new source of vitally important data. This includes how NKX2.5 dosage and localization regulated target genes during early stages of cardiac development and the identification of altered putative target genes caused by NKX2.5 mutations. See STEM CELLS now for all the fine print.

Bmi1+ Progenitors in the Murine Corneal Renewal

Researchers from the laboratory of Frederic Michon (University of Helsinki, Finland) recently set out to understand how stem/progenitor cells in the cornea ensure homeostasis in a mouse model. Their study demonstrates how Bmi1-positive cells represent corneal limbal progenitor cells and the authors use this information to demonstrate how these progenitors maintain homeostasis in the short-term. For more details, see STEM CELLS now.

Chromatin Alteration‐Induced Stem Cell Fate

Research from the team of Nadine Schuler (Saarland University, Germany) recently sought to highlight the mechanisms stem cells employ to endure exposure to genotoxic stresses by employing low-dose irradiation (LDR) exposure of hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs). Their new study establishes that stem cells accumulate and pass on heterochromatic chromatin‐alterations, which allows short-term stem cell pool maintenance but may also impair long-term functionality and promote a premature aging phenotype. Head over to STEM CELLS now for the news on how chromatin can affect stem cell fate.

Model Interactions between Fat Grafting and Breast Cancer Cells

As there exists an oncogenic concern with autologous fat grafting after breast cancer surgery, researchers from the lab of J. Peter Rubin (University of Pittsburgh, USA) aimed to model the interaction between fat grafts and breast cancer cells. Their new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine article now suggests that clinical fat grafting does not induce breast cancer cell growth and may even boast a suppressive effect. Great news!

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

January 5,2018 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Translating Regenerative Biology, Cord Blood Transplantation, Stem Cell Product Approval, and MSC Osteogenic Stimulation!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Translating Regenerative Biology

The study of tissue regeneration in different mammalian models has provided evidence of a range of species-specific regenerative capabilities. A new review from Ashley W. Seifert and Jennifer Simkin (University of Kentucky, Kentucky, USA) highlight how an understanding of the various mechanisms at play in an injury microenvironment in various species may allow us to create advances in regenerative therapies in human patients. For what sounds like a fascinating read, head over to STEM CELLS Translational Medicine.

HLA Homozygosity in Cord Blood Transplantation

Allogeneic human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) with a homozygous human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotype (HLA-homo HP) have been proposed as a cheaper and easier to achieve alternative to autologous iPSCs. Researchers from the lab of Yasuo Morishima (Central Japan Cord Blood Bank) sought to assess the allogeneic immunogenicity of iPSC transplantation from HLA-homo donors via cord blood transplantation (CBT). Interestingly, their new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine article suggests that patients possessing a single common HLA haplotype have a higher chance of yielding HLA-homo iPSCs.

Regulatory Path for an Approved Stem Cell Product

Holoclar®, the first stem cell-based medicine to receive authorization for commercial use throughout the European Union, takes the form of a graft derived from healthy patient-derived limbal stem cells (LSCs) to treat eye injuries in the same patient. At this current time, no other stem cell therapy has demonstrated the quality standards and clinical success required to achieve authorization status. Now, a new article from STEM CELLS Translational Medicine from Graziella Pellegrini (University of Modena e Reggio Emilia, Italy) reviews the regulatory pathway taken by Holoclar® to reach approval.

Osteogenic Stimulation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) come in huge number but display lower osteogenic capabilities when compared to the rarer bone marrow-derived MSCs. Now, researchers from the lab of Andre van Wijnen (Mayo Clinic, Minnesota, USA) have shown that cytochalasin D (CytoD), a fungal metabolite, act as an osteogenic stimulant of MSCs by blocking both cytoplasmic actin polymerization and gene-suppressive epigenetic mechanisms required for the acquisition of the osteogenic phenotype. See STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now for what could be an essential part of bone-related regenerative strategies.

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

January 1,2018 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - MSC Homeostasis, Transplantable Photoreceptors, CD133 link to Lipid Rafts, and Polycystin‐2 Role in Autophagy!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Oral Microbiota Balance Maintains Mesenchymal Stem Cell Homeostasis

While imbalances in our oral microbiota lead to the development of several periodontal and related diseases, the effect of such imbalances on oral mesenchymal stem cells (from the gingiva) remain relatively unknown. However, researchers from the laboratory of Yi Liu (Capital Medical University, Beijing, PR China) now demonstrate that antibiotic treatment, and the subsequent loss of the oral microbiota, promotes oral MSC deficiency and delayed wound healing in model mice. See STEM CELLS for all the details.

Transplantable Photoreceptors from cGMP iPSCs

The replacement of light-sensing retinal photoreceptors with cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) represents one of the most fast moving stem cell therapies. Researchers from the lab of Deepak A. Lamba (Buck Institute for Research on Aging, Novato, California, USA) have now combined a human iPSC line derived under current Good Manufacture Practice (cGMP)-compliant conditions with a small molecule-based retinal induction protocol to generate clinically relevant retinal cells. Encouragingly, subretinal transplantation of the iPSC-derived cells into immunodeficient host mouse eyes led to photoreceptor layer integration and development into mature photoreceptors. See STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now for all the details.

CD133 and Lipid Rafts

A review from the laboratory of Denis Corbeil (Technische Universität Dresden, Germany) hopes to gain the attention of any study employing the cell surface antigen prominin-1 (or CD133) as a marker for normal and cancer stem cells. Karbanová et al. discuss the association of CD133 with membrane microdomains known as lipid rafts and how this relates to proper immunodetection, the use of detergents, and the subsequent interpretation of results. See STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now for a thought-provoking read!

Role of Polycystin‐2 in Mediating Autophagy

Researchers investigating the role of the Polycystin‐2 (PKD2) gene in autophagy, a process essential for cell survival under stressful conditions, recently turned to human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) for some answers. This new STEM CELLS study from the laboratory of Xiaoqiang Yao (Chinese University of Hong Kong) establishes that polycystin‐2 promotes autophagy and reduces apoptotic death under glucose starvation via the modulation of AMPK and mTOR activity.

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

December 26,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - BM‐MSC-EVs ameliorate GVHD, MS-QC of hESCs, Adult Lung Repair, hMSC Metabolic Changes after Transplants!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Human BM‐MSC‐derived EVs ameliorate GVHD

Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BM-MSC) therapy for acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) shows great promise; however, the mechanisms at play remain to be fully delineated. Now, researchers from the lab of Yasuo Miura (Kyoto University Hospital/Hiroshima University, Japan) demonstrate that BM-MSC-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) can recapitulate the therapeutic effects of BM-MSCs and suggest that EVs preserve circulating naive T cells, possibly via the action of multiple miRNAs. See STEM CELLS now for what could represent the first step towards a cell-free therapy for aGVHD.

Mass Spectrometry Quality Control of Cell Cultures

The industrial growth of human stem cells for a wide range of therapeutic applications will require a certain degree of quality control to ensure safety and effectiveness. Researchers from the lab of Aleš Hampl (Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic) now establish that intact cell mass spectrometry (MS) represents a robust and straightforward approach for the quality control of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) cultures. Vaňhara et al. demonstrate how MS fingerprints can detect culture adapted and differentiated hESCs even given the lack of morphological and biochemical alterations. See STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now for all the details.

Lung Repair by Adult Lung Cell Transplantation

Given the longstanding therapeutic challenge of repairing injured lungs and the limitations of fetal cell-based therapy, researchers from the lab of Yair Reisner (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel) have investigated whether adult lungs could offer an alternative source of lung progenitors for transplantation. Krentsis et al. discovered that a single cell suspension derived from adult mouse lungs could repair lung damage in a mouse model, suggesting that the isolation and propagation of adult human lung stem cells may represent an exciting future means to treat human patients. Head over to STEM CELLS Translational Medicine to discover more about this fascinating approach.

Metabolic Changes to hMSC prompt Poor Cell Survival

A new study from the laboratory of Hervé Petite (Université Denis-Diderot, Paris, France sought to analyze the metabolic changes human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) undergo following exogenous administration to discern whether this represents a therapeutic “barrier”. Their new STEM CELLS study suggests that hMSCs do not survive well in vivo due to the failure of their metabolism to adapt to an ischemic environment, an insight that may prompt the introduction of metabolomic support strategies as a means to improve the therapeutic efficacy of hMSCs.

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

December 21,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Cancer Immunotherapy, Cellular Conspiracy of ALS, Vav1-null HSPCs, and Leukemic BM Niche Adaptation!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

hPSCs in Cell-based Cancer Immunotherapy

The first of this week’s Reviews comes from the laboratory of Dan S. Kaufman (University of California San Diego, USA), who highlight the potential for human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to produce immune cells that can target and treat refractory cancer subtypes. Zhu et al. describe how hPSC-derived cytotoxic T cells and natural killer (NK) cells can be engineered to foster anti-tumor activity and can be manufactured in huge numbers. See STEM CELLS now for what promises to be a fascinating read.

The Cellular Conspiracy of ALS

Research efforts towards an understanding of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) concentrate, perhaps understandably, on the neurons lost during the development of the disease. However, a new review article from the labs of Andrea Serio (Kings College London) and Rickie Patani (University College London/The Francis Crick Institute, UK) suggests there may be another “cellular conspiracy” at play. See STEM CELLS now for all the information on how non-neural cells may be major determinants of ALS and how the integration of cross‐modal approaches may provide new therapeutic strategies.

IL‐11 inhibits engraftment of Vav1-null HSPCs

This week’s lone research article comes from researchers from the lab of David A. Williams (Harvard University, Boston, USA) who report on how deletion of Vav1, a hematopoietic-specific activator of Rac, compromises engraftment of transplanted adult HSPCs (hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells). Their new study indicates a requirement for Vav1 in the response of HSPCs to the irradiation-induced upregulation of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-11 (IL-11) in the bone marrow. See STEM CELLS for all the details.

Leukemic adaptation of the BM niche

This week’s last review, from the lab of Peter Kurre (Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, USA), discusses the bone marrow microenvironment as a critical contributor to therapeutic resistance and relapse progression in hematological malignancies. Doron et al. take this opportunity to discuss stromal conversion by leukemia and the resulting aberrant signaling within the niche, the advantages and limitations of available experimental model systems, and highlight current questions and any important opportunities. See STEM CELLS now for a great read!

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

December 18,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - iPSC Secretome, Stem Cell‐Derived Retina, Rejuvenating old HSCs, and Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Klotho Mediates Protection by iPSC Secretome

Researchers from the lab of Connie C.W. Hsia (University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, USA) recently assessed the anti-oxidant capacity of condition medium derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which contains the cell's “secretome”. Gazdhar et al. now report both the importance of the α-Klotho protein in maintaining iPSC-mediated anti-oxidation and cytoprotection and also the potential for the iPSC secretome as a cell-free therapy for protection against lung injury. See STEM CELLS now for all the details.

In Silico Gene Sorting of Stem Cell‐Derived Retina

In an attempt to study single cells in the retina, researchers from the lab of David Gamm (University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA) have created and then analyzed optic vesicles generated from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) via standard single-cell RNA‐seq principle component analysis. Encouragingly, this allowed the authors of this exciting new study to deeply and rapidly examine retinal cell progeny and gene profile individual neural retina cell types. Head over to STEM CELLS now for all fine print!

Microvesicles from Young MSCs Rejuvenate Aged HSCs

Aging hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) represent a significant problem for effective bone marrow transplantation; but, how can we avoid this unfortunate problem? Researchers from the lab of Vaijayanti P. Kale (National Centre for Cell Science, Maharashtra, India) now demonstrate that microvesicles from young mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) can rejuvenate aged HSCs via the transfer of autophagy-related mRNAs. Importantly, this new STEM CELLS study also demonstrates that rejuvenated HSCs display enhanced function in transplantation experiments; great news!

Delineating Notch-mediated Self-Renewal of Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells

While investigating the precise roles of Notch receptors in skeletal muscle stem cells, researchers from the laboratory of SiewHui Low (Carnegie Institution for Science, Baltimore, USA) have discovered that Notch3 regulates self-renewal. Their new study demonstrates that Dll4 in immature muscle fibers activates Notch3 on adjacent myoblasts to signal them to exit the cell cycle and return to mitotic quiescence, so ensuring the restoration in stem cell pool after repair-mediated activation. See STEM CELLS now for more of the exciting details!

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

December 14,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Induced Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells, MSC Treatment for DRE, iPSC-derived Corneal Epithelial Cells, and Stem Cell Therapy for CLI!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

iPSC-Derived Mesenchymal Cells for Nerve Repair

Researchers from the laboratory of Rocky S. Tuan (University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, USA) set themselves a lofty goal: build a better mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)! Their new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine study now describes the production of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells (MiMPCs), which secrete various neurotrophic and neuroprotective factors and promote neurite outgrowth in chick embryonic dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cultures. Brick et al. suggest that this new and improved MSC-like cell may represent a renewable source of therapeutic cells and a potential alternative to MSCs for peripheral nerve repair.

BM-MSC Transplantations Improve DRE in Children

As a new treatment option for drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE) in children, researchers working in the lab of Marcin Majka (Jagiellonian University Collegium Medicum, Cracow, Poland) have assessed the safety, feasibility, and potential efficacy of autologous bone marrow cell (BM-MSC) transplantation. The results of this pilot study, published in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine, report no adverse events and neurological and cognitive improvement in all patients, including a reduction in the number of epileptic seizures and an absence of status epilepticus episodes. Great news!

Differentiation of hiPSCs to Corneal Epithelial Cells

Limbal stem cell (LSC) transplantation represents an interesting regenerative measure in the fight against limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) and the loss of the corneal epithelial layer. However, given the scarcity of LSCs, researchers have sought to discover alternative strategy and now, researchers from the laboratory of Majlinda Lako (Newcastle University, UK) report on the generation of corneal epithelial cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Interestingly, Kamarudin et al. demonstrate that different hiPSC lines displayed differential differentiation propensities due to differential activity of the endogenous BMP signaling pathway. See STEM CELLS now for all the details!

Stem Cell Therapy for Critical Limb Ischemia

Severe critical limb ischemia (CLI) currently relies on limb amputation as the only treatment option; however, many research teams hope that stem cell-based interventions may improve this unfavorable outcome. To help us wade through the pertinent data, the good people from the lab of David A. Hess (Western University, Ontario, Canada) have brought together an “Integrated Review of Pre-clinical and Clinical Studies”. See STEM CELLS now for a vital read.

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

December 11,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Müller Glia-Derived Progenitor Cells, hPSC Osteogenesis, lncRNA-mediated Differentiation, and MSC in vivo Kinetics!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Deciphering RA-mediated control of MGPCs

Researchers from the laboratory of Andy J. Fischer (Ohio State University, USA) recently employed a chick model system to decipher how retinoic acid (RA)-signaling influences the proliferation and the formation of Müller glia-derived progenitor cells (MGPCs). Their STEM CELLS study suggests that Müller glia of damaged retinas upregulate cellular RA binding proteins (CRABP), leading to the formation of proliferating MGPCs and the enhancement of the neurogenic potential of MGPCs and stem cells in the circumferential marginal zone (CMZ).

Epigenetic Influence on hPSC Osteogenesis

The process by which human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) differentiate into bone-forming osteoblasts represents and incompletely understood process. However, researchers from the lab of Nicole I. zur Nieden (University of California Riverside, USA) now suggest that epigenetic patterns at critical regulatory genes (osteocalcin (OCN), PAX7, and TWIST1) can strongly influence lineage derivation and mineralization. See STEM CELLS now for all the details!

Controlling Neural Differentiation via lncRNAs

Rather than osteogenesis, the labs of Guiying Wang and Jiuhong Kang (Tongji University, Shanghai, China) have sought to determine all there is to know about neurogenesis from embryonic stem cells (ESCs)! Their new STEM CELLS study describes how a newly discovered long noncoding RNA (lncRNA-1604) functions as a novel competing endogenous RNA of miR-200c and a regulator of the core transcription factors ZEB1 and ZEB2 during neural differentiation. Sounds like a fantastic study!

Reviewing in vivo Kinetics of MSCs

Researchers from the laboratories of Michael S. Roberts and Haolu Wang (University of Queensland, Australia) believe that mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) therapy optimization may be accelerated via the understanding of MSC distribution in vivo, long-term viability, as well as their biological fate. Their new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine review outlines current knowledge of in vivo kinetics of MSCs, analyses methods employed for MSC detection, discusses the pharmacokinetic modeling of these data, and provides insights on the future development of effective therapeutic strategies using pharmacokinetic modeling.

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

December 1,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Treating Ischemic Retinopathies, Anti-tumor Immune Cells, MSC Rejection Trial, and Huntington's Disease!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Optimizing ECFC Treatment of Ischemic Retinopathies

Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) promote vascular repair and regeneration of the ischemic retina, although the application of this strategy to human patients will require extensive preclinical testing. A recent report from the lab of Reinhold J. Medina (Queen's University Belfast, United Kingdom) establishes that systemic or intravitreal administration of an appropriate dose of ECFCs confers therapeutic benefit without eliciting an immune response or toxicity. See STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now to see how this study provides excellent preclinical evidence for ECFC treatment of ischemic retinopathies.

Generating iPSCs from Anti-tumor Immune Cells for Immunotherapy

A small proportion of lymphocytes in the peripheral blood known as γδT cells exert potent anti-tumor activity; however, ex vivo expansion to the large numbers required for therapy leads to a loss in effectiveness. As a means to get around this vexing problem, researchers from the laboratory of Takashi Aoi (Kobe University, Japan) have generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from stimulated γδT cells in human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) culture. Resultant γδT-iPSCs displayed rearrangements at the TCRG and TCRD gene locus and demonstrated the ability to differentiate into hematopoietic progenitors. See STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now to see how this strategy could pave the way toward novel immunotherapy treatments.

MSC Pilot Trial for Acute Liver Allograft Rejection

A STEM CELLS Translational Medicine study from Ming Shi and Fu-Sheng Wang (Beijing 302 Hospital, PR China) has recently reported the findings of a trial of umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cell (UC-MSC) therapy in liver transplant patients with acute graft rejection. Encouragingly, the results suggest that “UC-MSC infusion for acute graft rejection following liver transplantation is feasible and may mediate a therapeutic immunosuppressive effect.” Great news!

Stem Cells and Huntington's Disease

A new review article from Bronwen Connor (University of Auckland, New Zealand) in STEM CELLS aims to highlight the potential for stem cell-based therapeutics for Huntington's disease (HD). This review covers compensatory neurogenesis, cell replacement therapies, and cell reprogramming to model and treat the disease and aims to delineate potential gaps in knowledge and identify future directions. Sounds like a fascinating read!

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!