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Highlights of current exciting developments, ranging from research papers to court decisions to industry regulations

November 20, 2017

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Past Buzz

November 13,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Boosting hMSC Osteogenesis, Accelerating Stem Cell Trials, Investigating Impaired Cardiac Repair, and Maintaining HCC CSCs!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

RUNX2 Programs hMSC Osteogenesis

Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) may possess tri-lineage differentiation potential, but stimulating high levels of osteogenesis has proven a tricky proposition. A new report from the lab of James E. Dixon (University of Nottingham, United Kingdom) now describes an efficient new osteogenic strategy: the application of non-virally derived recombinant RUNX2 protein via the glycosaminoglycan-binding enhanced transduction (GET) delivery system (GET-RUNX2). Excitingly, the high transduction efficiency of the GET system allowed GET-RUNX2 to trigger osteogenesis in hMSCs by enhancing target gene expression directly. For all the details on this approach to repair bone trauma and disorders without genetic modifications, see STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now!

Accelerating Stem Cells Clinical Trials via Nursing Competencies

A recent Perspective article from Rodica Stan describes the experience of the establishment of a California Institute for Regenerative Medicine-associated Alpha Stem Cell Clinic at the City of Hope (California, USA). Perrin et al. report the definition of the “hybrid nurse” role, a person with nursing competencies in both clinical care and research, as the highlight of the process and the key to success. Head over to STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now to understand how nursing competencies play a crucial role in the stem cell clinic.

Impaired Cardiac Repair in Diabetes: A Role for SDF-1:CXCR4

Diabetes causes impaired post-acute myocardial infarction (AMI) cardiac repair, and a new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine study from the lab of Feng Dong (Northeast Ohio Medical University, Ohio, USA) sought to figure out why! Mayorga et al. now report the dysregulation of the SDF-1:CXCR4 axis, which controls the mobilization and migration of stem cells from the BM to the site of tissue injury, in a disease-specific mouse model. However, this new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine study also demonstrates that overexpression of SDF-1 may represent a potentially exciting treatment option.

Translation Elongation Factor Helps to maintain Hepatocellular Carcinoma CSCs

Deciphering the mechanisms that regulate cancer stem cells (CSCs) may permit the development of potent anti-cancer therapies. In a previous study, researchers from the lab of Dan Xie (Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, China) demonstrated that overexpression of the eukaryotic initiation factor 5A2 (EIF5A2) promoted hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell metastasis and angiogenesis. Now, their new STEM CELLS study suggests that EIF5A2 contributes to the maintenance of HCC CSCs via the c-Myc/miR-29b axis, raising the possibility of developing a new CSCs‐specific therapy.

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

November 9,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Hematopoietic Regulation and Regeneration, Restoration of Dysfunctional Endothelial Progenitor Cells, and the Production of Mature Heart Muscle!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Reviewing the Epigenetic Regulation of Hematopoiesis

The title for this Stem Cells Buzz article says it all! Straight out of the lab of Annarita Miccio (Imagine Institute, Paris, France) comes a summary of recent epigenetic and genetic studies in hematopoietic cells that have provided fresh insight into human hematopoiesis and have stimulated the construction of novel therapeutic approaches. For all the details on this new article from Antoniani et al., scoot on over to STEM CELLS Translational Medicine!

PPARα Microparticles Reprogram Dysfunctional Bone Marrow EPCs

Patients suffering from various metabolic pathologies present with a compromised vascular system caused partly by dysfunctional bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Now, a team of researchers from lab of Maria Carmen Martinez (Université Angers, France) has reprogrammed EPCs via small membrane vesicles known as microparticles (MPs) carrying the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARα), which promotes EPC maturation and myeloid lineage differentiation. While EPCs from mice fed on a high-fat diet displayed reduced levels of circulating EPCs and impaired EPC and monocytic progenitor cell differentiation, treatment with MPs carrying PPARα restored the lost differentiation capacity and enhanced in vivoangiogenesis. See STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now for all the details.

Synergistically Regenerating Hematopoiesis

To boost hematopoietic regeneration following chemotherapy, researchers from the lab of Phuong L. Doan (Duke University, Durham, NC, USA) sought out a synergistic solution. In their new STEM CELLS study, Piryani et al. demonstrated that co-treatment with the epidermal growth factor (EGF) hematopoietic growth factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) efficiently accelerated hematopoietic regeneration. Their study also indicated that EGF upregulated the receptor for G‐CSF (G‐CSFR), and so this new combination could represent an effective means to treat chemotherapy‐induced myelosuppression.

A Little Stretch Induces Engineered Heart Muscle Function

While the efficiency of cardiomyocytes differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) keeps on rising with each study, the problem of functional immaturity remains. New research from Joseph C. Wu and Oscar J. Abilez (Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA) employed computational modeling to test the effects of “passive stretch” on iPSC-derived heart tissue maturation. Excitingly, a little stretching significantly affected structural and functional maturation and thereby, may represent an essential step towards the clinical application of functional engineered heart tissues. Stretch your legs (or fingers?) and head over to STEM CELLS to read more!

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

November 6,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? – Inflammatory Cycling in MSCs, Slimming-down MSCs with Vesicles, Boosting Bone and Cartilage Regeneration, and Trialing Autologous Cord Blood!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

MSCs-EVs Caught in an Inflammatory Cycle

A new study by the lab of Matthew T. Harting (University of Texas McGovern Medical School, USA) has suggested that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and secreted extracellular vesicles (EVs) may be caught in an inflammatory cycle! Specifically, their new STEM CELLS study demonstrates that inflammatory stimulation of MSCs results in the release of EVs with enhanced anti-inflammatory effects, attributed in part to COX2/PGE2 expression. Could this new report lead to the construction of EV therapeutic strategies for inflammatory injury and disease?

Vesicles Help 3D MSCs Slim Down

Vesicles also play a significant role in our next study from the laboratory of Yaojiong Wu (Tsinghua University, China). Their new STEM CELLS study sought to delineate the mechanisms behind mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) size reduction under three-dimensional (3D) culture conditions. A decrease in MSC size, as compared to typical two-dimensional culture, reduces lung vascular obstructions following MSC therapy and this new study suggests that MSCs “slim down” by increasing vesicle excretion mediated by lowering cytoskeleton tension. Sounds like a great read!

Boosting Cartilage and Bone Regeneration: A Review

A new review article from researchers from the laboratory of Ennio Tasciotti (Houston Methodist Research Institute, Texas, USA) aims to highlight the limitations of musculoskeletal regeneration and summarize the most relevant acellular tissue engineering approaches. This review maintains a focus on strategies likely to be efficiently translated into clinical practice and reflects on contemporary and cutting-edge regenerative approaches in surgery. While studies have highlighted a range of preclinical solutions for bone and cartilage regeneration, only a few platforms have been able to move from the bench to the bedside. See STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now for a timely review article!

Trialing Autologous Cord Blood Infusion in Young Cerebral Palsy Patients

STEM CELLS Translational Medicine brings us the results of a recent trial carried out by the laboratory of Jessica Sun (Duke University Medical Center, California, USA). The authors describe a Phase II trial of autologous cord blood (ACB) infusions in children with Cerebral palsy (CP) to test whether this approach could improve motor functions (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01147653; IND 14360). In brief, the results demonstrate that appropriately dosed ACB infusions have the potential to improve brain connectivity and gross motor function in young children with CP. Encouraging news!

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

November 2,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - ASC-mediated Vasculogenesis, Inhibition of PSC Tumorigenesis, Stem Cells and Cancer, and MSC Characterization!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

ASC-derived NOTCH2 Promotes Vasculogenesis

Researchers from the lab of Vincenzo Terlizzi (University of Groningen, Netherlands) hope that adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASC) can functionally replace the pericytes lost during diabetic retinopathy (DR) and boost the formation of the vasculature. Their new study demonstrates that NOTCH2 secretion by ASCs promotes in vitro vasculogenesis in 2D and 3D in vitro and promotes ASC migration to the retinal microenvironment. For all the details on this fascinating study, head over to STEM CELLS now.

A New Means to inhibit hPSC Tumorigenesis

While the transplantation of cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) seems to have a bright future, there still exist concerns regarding the potential tumorigenicity of “leftover” undifferentiated cells. To combat these fears, the group of Ken-ichiro Kosai (Kagoshima University, Japan) has described a novel method for the efficient generation of tumorigenic cell-targeting lentiviral vectors (TC-LVs) with various promoters upstream of a fluorescent protein and suicide genes. See STEM CELLS for all the fine print on this new tumorigenic cell-killing strategy.

MSCs and Cancer: A Review

Studies suggest that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may play roles in both the promotion and inhibition of cancer progression.  A new review article from the lab of Gianpaolo Papaccio (Università degli Studi della Campania, Naples, Italy) discusses recent findings in the hope of clarifying the pivotal role of MSCs in cancer development and determining their potential use in cancer treatment. See STEM CELLS now for a great read!

Characterizing MSCs: An Essential Step for Regenerative Medicine

The widespread application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in regenerative therapies inspired our next review from the labs of Simon Cool (A-STAR, Singapore) and Andre van Wijnen (Mayo Clinic, USA). The authors suggest that wide-ranging characterization metrics for MSCs may more accurately predict treatment outcomes of MSC-based therapies. Additionally, the duo discuss currently appreciated characteristics of MSCs and consider recent studies that describe potentially valuable criteria when considering clinical applications. STEM CELLS Translational Medicine has all the juicy details, what are you waiting for?!

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

October 30,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Distal Limb Wound Healing, Dentin-Pulp Tissue Regeneration, Report from the ISCBI, and MSCs Requirement for Survivin!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

MSC-mediated Healing of Distal Limb Wounds

Both humans and horses may benefit from allogeneic mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy for distal extremity wounds. To assess the potential benefits of this treatment option, researchers from the laboratory of Dori L. Borjesson (UC Davis, California, USA) assessed gross, histologic, and transcriptional features of healing in a horse model. Encouragingly, Textor et al. discovered that direct injection of MSCs into the wound margin correlated to smaller wound area and improved histologic outcomes and the authors hope that their finding may be directly applicable to chronic wound studies in human patients. Stop horsing around and head over to STEM CELLS Translational Medicine for more details.

PDGF-BB Boosts Stem Cell-Based Dentin-Pulp Tissue Regeneration

An exciting new study in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine from Xinquan Jiang and Wenjie Zhang (Shanghai Jiao Tong University, PR China) sought to delineate how platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) promotes dental pulp stem cell (DPSC)-mediated dentin-pulp complex regeneration. Zhang et al. discovered that the PDGF-BB dimer enhanced DPSC proliferation and odontoblastic differentiation, stimulated angiogenesis, and facilitated migration via PI3K/Akt signaling pathway activation. All these enhancements permitted PDGF-BB gene-modified DPSCs to generate more dentin-like mineralized tissue surrounded by highly vascularized dental pulp-like connective tissue than unmodified DPSCs!

International Stem Cell Banking Initiative Workshop Activity Report

A recent article from Glyn N. Stacey (UK stem Cell Bank) and Soo Kyung Koo (Korea National Institute of Health) reviews recent discussions among world-leading groups working on the provision of stem cell lines for research and clinical use, which addresses the latest thinking on in issues of quality control, safety, and ethics. A key outcome from the reported workshops in the USA and Korea was the confirmation of the need for standards, and, in particular, the principles of best practice developed by the International Stem Cell Banking Initiative. For all the details, see STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now!

An Essential Role for Survivin in MSCs

A new study from the labs of Louis M. Pelus and Pratibha Singh (Indiana University, USA) demonstrates that Survivin regulates mouse and human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) function and suggest that clinical application of Survivin may enhance MSC recovery and activity following insult or stress. In their new STEM CELLS study, Singh et al. show how MSC survival (surprise!), expansion, lineage commitment, and migration require Survivin. In vivo analysis also established that Survivin loss suppressed MSC migration to a wound site and compromised their hematopoiesis-supporting capacity.

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

October 26,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - MSC Therapy for BD, Wnt Signaling in Skin Development and Epidermal SCs, miRNAs Inhibit HSC Formation, and an In Vivo Osteogenesis Showdown!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

MSC Therapy in Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

Extreme premature birth in children often leads to bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), and while animal models suggest that mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) therapy can protect the lungs, there are no systematic reviews or meta-analysis of the preclinical evidence……until now! Researchers from the lab of Bernard Thébaud (Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ontario, Canada) have crunched the numbers and have discovered that MSCs significantly improved alveolarization and ameliorated pulmonary hypertension, lung inflammation, fibrosis, angiogenesis, and apoptosis, irrespective of the timing of treatment, source, dose, or route of administration. However, the study highlights methodological shortcomings and the need to implement adequate reporting standards. See STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now for all the details.

How Wnt Signaling Controls Skin Development and Epidermal Stem Cells

A new review article from the laboratory of Wen-Hui Lien (Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium) hopes to provide us all with a concise summary of current knowledge on Wnt signaling pathways in the regulation of skin development, hair follicle morphogenesis, and governance of epidermal stem cells during tissue homeostasis. Furthermore, the authors also discuss the potential crosstalk of Wnt signaling with other pathways involved in these processes. See STEM CELLS now for a skin-tingling read!

microRNAs Inhibit HSC Differentiation from PSCs

The low engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) derived from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) limits their therapeutic application; but just what is holding them back? Research from the laboratory of Majlinda Lako (Newcastle University, UK) posits that the expression of a distinct pattern of microRNAs prevents, at least in part, the full functionality of PSC-HSCs. The microRNA expression alterations observed promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis and the acquisition of an adherent phenotype in vitro. See all the fine print over at STEM CELLS.

In vivo Osteogenesis Showdown: Adipose MSCs vs. Bone Marrow MSCs

A new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine articlefrom the lab of Pierre Layrolle (University of Nantes, France) has brought us the results of an interesting showdown: the in vivo bone forming potential of bone marrow and adipose mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Brennan et al. now reveal that bone marrow MSCs hold the advantage of adipose MSCs with regards to osteogenesis and engraftment, although bone marrow MSCs exhibit lower angiogenic potential. Therefore, even though adipose MSCs represent an easily accessible and easy to cultivate cell type, bone marrow MSCs seem to have the in vivo osteogenic edge!

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

October 22,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Single-Cell SSPCs Analysis, Treg-mediated Cancer Cell Stemness, Parthenogenetic ESC-derived Cortical Neurons, and Protection of Retinal Ganglion Cells!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Identifying SSPCs with Single-Cell RNA-Seq

A recent study from the laboratory of Bart Deplancke (Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne and Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, Lausanne, Switzerland) has applied single‐cell RNA‐sequencing to identify somatic stem and progenitor cells (SSPCs) across a wide range of tissues. Interestingly, the study describes a SSPC classifier that only employs the combined expression of only 23 genes to distinguish SSPCs across various tissues. Therefore, this report provides a valuable resource for the identification and ordering of SSPCs across differentiation stages. See STEM CELLS now for all the details.

Tregs Promote Breast Cancer Cell Stemness

T regulatory cells, or Tregs, reduce anti-tumor immunity and stimulate angiogenesis and metastasis in breast cancer, and now, a new report suggests that Tregs also induce stemness in breast cancer cells. This exciting study, from Na Li and Rong Xiang (Nankai University, Tianjin, China), also describes a link between Sox2 expression in breast cancer cells and the recruitment of Tregs, thereby, suggesting that targeting this communication line may represent an efficient means to treat aggressive forms of breast cancer. Head over STEM CELLS now to read more on this new breakthrough!

Integrative Cortical-like Neurons Produced from Parthenogenetic ESCs

Diploid parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells (Pg-ESCs) have emerged as a potential source for histocompatible derivative cells for therapeutic applications. Now, a team of researchers from the labs of Annie Varrault and Tristan Bouschet (Université de Montpellier, France) has demonstrated that Pg-ESCs can give rise to cortical-like progenitors and electrophysiologically active glutamatergic neurons that integrate into the injured adult cortex and send axonal projections in the host brain. Could Pg-ESC therapy represent an exciting new treatment option for the loss of neurons caused by disease or injury? See STEM CELLS now to find out!

hMSCs and PDGF Protect Human Retinal Ganglion Cells

To test the ability of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to support retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival in vivo, a team of researchers from the laboratory of Keith R Martin (University of Cambridge, UK) has employed a human retinal explant model of optic nerve injury. Osborne et al. discovered that hMSCs (and the secreted growth factor PDGF) reduced RGC loss and apoptosis following injury and, therefore, may represent an effective therapeutic strategy to mitigate degenerative visual loss. STEM CELLS has all the details on this sensational study!

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

October 19,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - CAR T Cell Therapies, Intestinal Stem Cell Fitness, Alveolar Injury treatment with EPCs, and iPSC Neuropsychiatric Disease Models!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Lessons Learned from CAR T cell Therapies for B Cell Malignancies

Soon to be approved chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR T) cell therapies for B cell malignancies in pediatric and adult patients represent a triumph of a true bench to bedside clinical translation. A new STEM CELLS article from Michael D. Jain and Marco L. Davila (H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Florida, USA) aims to review the “lessons learned” from pre-clinical and human experience in this area. Sounds like a fascinating read!

Wnt-Signaling Pathway Regulates Intestinal Stem Cell Fitness

While multiple studies have demonstrated the importance of Wnt-signaling to intestinal stem cell (ISC) biology, the lab of Karen R Reed (Cardiff University, UK) decided to employ a more subtle approach in the hope of learning some of the intricacies. To this end, Young et al. prompted a minor misregulation of the Wnt-signaling pathway through the inhibition of the β-catenin regulator Apc2. Their new STEM CELLS paper describes how even a small change can significantly alter the function and fitness of ISCs.

EPCs Improve Alveolar Injury

Treatment of pre-term infants with high levels of oxygen (hyperoxia) can disrupt lung alveolar and vascular development; however, animal studies have suggested that endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) therapy may counter these problems. Now, researchers from the group of Alexandra B Firsova (Monash University) and Richard Mollard (University of Melbourne, Australia) have revealed that “fresh” bone-marrow-derived EPC-like cells can fully recover hyperoxia-induced alveolar disruption. Unfortunately, long-term in vitro culture of EPCs reduced therapeutic outcome and promoted unwanted growth. It seems that fresh is best for lung repair; check it out for yourself over at STEM CELLS Translational Medicine.

Reviewing iPSC Models for Neuropsychiatric Diseases

Underlying disease processes are generally unknown, and therapies lack efficacy; this is the unfortunate state of affairs for the sufferers of the major neuropsychiatric conditions of schizophrenia, affective disorders, and infantile autism. However, a new article from the lab of Anthony Wynshaw-Boris (Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Ohio, USA) now reviews how patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) models and three-dimensional organoids with the capacity to differentiate into neurons and other neuronal cell lineages may lead to significant advances. See STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now for all the information on this fascinating area.

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

October 15,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Enhanced RGC Generation, Bladder Tissue Engineering, Placental MSC-Treatment of Cardiomyopathy, and MSC-EVs Enhance Survival after Irradiation!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Enhanced Generation of Human Retinal Ganglion Cells

A new report from the labs of Donald J. Zack (Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Maryland, USA) and Derek S. Welsbie (University of California, USA) describes a novel means to efficiently differentiate and purify retinal ganglion cells (RGC) from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs). Employing CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene editing, Sluch et al. created a human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line in which an RGC-specific gene controls the expression of a fluorescent reporter and a unique cell-surface protein. Applying this system permitted the construction of an enhanced differentiation protocol and the facile purification of RGCs; see STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now for all the details.

Status and Further Challenges in Tissue Engineering of the Urinary Bladder

A recent article from the laboratory of Jan Adamowicz (Nicolaus Copernicus University, Bydgoszcz, Poland) appraises the current status and future challenges that face scientists working in urinary bladder regeneration. This review article emphasizes the expectations of urologists in the hope that a defined interdisciplinary approach might help to accelerate urinary bladder tissue engineering research. Head on over to STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now for a great read!

Treating Diabetic Cardiomyopathy with Placenta-derived MSCs

Diabetic cardiomyopathy presents with changes in cardiac structure and function in the absence of coronary artery disease and hypertension. As mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) display cardioprotective features, a team from the lab of Carsten Tschöpe (Charité – University Medicine Berlin, Germany) sought to assess their therapeutic potential. Excitingly, Van Linthout et al. discovered that intravenous administration of placenta-derived MSCs led to cardioprotection during the early stages of diabetic cardiomyopathy in a mouse model. Could these cells represent an exciting new therapeutic option for human patients? Find out over at STEM CELLS Translational Medicine right now!

MSC-EVs Provide Long-term Survival after Total Body Irradiation

Whole body radiation employed in the conditioning of patients before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation leads to severe side effects; however, a new report from the lab of Claudia Lange (University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany) reports that extracellular vesicles-derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC-EVs) may provide protection. Overall, Schoefinius et al. now suggest that MSC-EVs promote the survival of hematopoietic stem cells following radiation damage; see STEM CELLS today for a more in-depth view!

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!

October 10,2017 What’s the Stem Cells Buzz this Week? - Naming MSCs, NHIE Cell Therapy, mESCs go “Surfen”, and Promoting Tendon Differentiation with Fos!

The Stem Cells Portal brings you a roundup of some of the new and exciting stories in the ever-changing world of stem cells, regenerative medicine, and beyond!

Naming MSCs – The Battle Goes on!

A recent STEM CELLS Translational Medicine Perspective laid out the claim for mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to be renamed “medicinal signaling cells”, given their well-known paracrine actions. However, the laboratory of Donald G. Phinney (Scripps Research Institute, Florida, USA) refute this claim in a new STEM CELLS article. They argue that “the paracrine-centric viewpoint and proposed name change ignores a wealth of old and new data that unequivocally demonstrate the stem cell nature of MSCs, and also overlooks a large effort to exploit homologous applications of MSCs in human clinical trials”. Sounds like a fascinating read; what are you waiting for?

Comparing Cell Therapy Candidates for NHIE

Despite neuroprotection by therapeutic hypothermia, the perinatal complication neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (NHIE) suffers from poor neurological prognosis. In their search for a suitable cell therapy candidate for NHIE, the lab of Guillet Benjamin (Aix Marseille University, France) compared ready-to-use human umbilical cord blood cells (HUCBC) to bankable but allogeneic endothelial progenitors (ECFC). This new STEM CELLS Translational Medicine study suggests that while “ECFCs represent an efficient candidate, HUCBC autologous criteria and easier availability make them the ideal candidate for hypoxic-ischemic cell therapy”.

Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells go “surfen” Towards Pluripotency

An interesting new STEM CELLS study from the lab of Kamil Godula (University of California San Diego, USA) suggests that the best way to maintain mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC) pluripotency is to go “surfen”! Specifically, Huang et al. describe how surfen, an antagonist of cell surface glycosaminoglycans required for growth factor association with cognate receptors, can inhibit differentiation and promote mESCpluripotency. The authors suggest that targeting the stem cell “glycome” with small molecules such a surfen to silence differentiation cues may represent an efficient means to control stem cell fate.

Early Stage Teno-Lineage Differentiation with Fos

Researchers from the lab of Hong Wei Ouyang and Xiao Chen (Zhejiang University, PR China) have uncovered a new factor that promotes the early differentiation towards a tendon fate. By studying postnatal rat Achilles tendon, Chen et al. discovered an early role for Fos expression and, furthermore, the team demonstrated that Fos overexpression in tendon stem/progenitor cells (TSPCs) boosted the expression of tendon markers and improved tendon formation in vivo. For all the fine print, see STEM CELLS Translational Medicine now.

That’s a wrap for now! Please feel free to leave a comment and discuss the papers covered here on the Stem Cells Buzz. Happy reading!